JUAN ON JUAN Const. Prince Carino

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  • To serve the country and the community is every girl and boys first dream. Children often tell you that they would like to be doctor, a teacher, a nurse, a firefighter, or a policeman if you ask them what they want to be when they grow up.  The call was not different for Const. Prince Carino, and although being born in Mandaluyong to parents from Manila and Cervantes, Ilocos Sur, growing up in Canada gave him a sense to serve others in many ways.

    PNT: What activities did you do as a young boy? Did any of it point towards your current career?

    PC: I’m a very competitive person so I was always drawn to playing sports, more specifically football and basketball. Playing these team sports helped me develop leadership qualities and the ability to work well with others. It definitely helped guide me to policing since policing is definitely a job where you need these skills to be successful.

    I attended St. Thomas More Collegiate from grade 8-12 and during my youth I was very active in sports. My mom was a big role model for me growing up as she instilled the family values as well as teaching us about the Catholic faith. I believed this helped inspire me to help others who are not as fortunate. Going to STM and learning about how my faith played a role in my life was important to me and helped me grow as a person and make the right decisions growing up. Attending church with my family and volunteering kept me from otherwise getting into trouble. I think that being a Catholic and practicing what we are taught about serving others without judging is important to what I do  now and a lot of that had much to do with the way I was raised and the community I was raised in.

    PNT: What made you interested in the police force?

    PC: I was interested in policing because of the variety of challenges the job presents. Every call you get or every situation you deal with is different and you don’t get that with many jobs  The job is definitely not for everyone because there is always a level a danger that we face doing it, and that, combined with the service and outreach we provide to the community, is very fulfilling to me.

    PNT: What is your current rank? What do you do in this capacity?

    PC: I’m currently a constable and work in the patrol division, so you know the police in uniform that you see on the street? That would be me.

    PNT: What are the advantages and disadvantages of being in this line of career?

    PC: I would say the advantages of this career, first and foremost, is the flexibility of the schedule. We work four days on and four days off which is great for spending time with family and friends. Also the fact that we aren’t always tied down to a desk, we patrol the city and take a variety of calls from all over our set districts. Lastly, the ability to move within the job is great, being able to branch off from general duties to specializations, and pursue things that interest you like investigations, forensics, gangs, etc. which  is good in developing a diverse career.

    Some of the disadvantages is the dangerous nature of the job. Police are viewed very differently in the public eye now more than ever, and a few negative interactions viewed on the news or social media have given us a bad image. This is why we do outreach and exposure to communities because it is very important for people to have a positive view of what we do.

    PNT: What would you advise to young people who are inclined to go into the service?

    PC: I would tell them to do what they feel passionate about and really how they can use their talents to improve the communities that the come from. To maintain positive relationships with everyone they meet and strive to be the best in whatever it is they choose to do. This way they can be positive role models to people who come after them. Put in the work and don’t give up because there will be adversity but how you handle that is really what defines you. Going into the military or police force is not only a career but a lifestyle change, so preparing for that change early will be an advantage.

    PNT: What do you see yourself doing in the next 10 years?

    PC: It’s hard to tell but I want to continue working with youth and doing community work within the police force. It is a passion of mine and I love doing outreach work, helping and giving back to the community, especially the growing  Filipino community because I am also an immigrant to Canada, and know how hard it was growing up here, so to be able to help the kids who are struggling and make that transition easier for them is important to me.

    PNT: If you weren’t in the police force now, what would you be doing?

    PC: (Chuckles) Well, since my opportunity as an artista in the Philippines has passed, I would probably be doing work helping high risk youth. I was always interested in military work as well, so anything really where you can serve people in a way that provides them an opportunity to better their lives I think I would do.

    Prince’s natural ability to talk to and engage people in a conversation is one of his best qualities, and perhaps, one that helps him at his career.  His care for and affiliation with the Filipino community, in particular, is what endears him to work with young people who come to Canada and need a little more help to adjust to their new environment. With a heart for work with the community and objectives like these, it is no wonder that this team player never gets the bench.

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